Special Issue "Yeasts in Soils"

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Andrey M. Yurkov
Website
Guest Editor
Leibniz Institute DSMZ, German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures, Braunschweig, Germany

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Yeasts inhabit soils worldwide, from tropics to polar regions and from top horizons up to two meters deep. They have been repeatedly isolated from extreme acid, alkaline, cold (cryogenic), and purely drained (hydromorphic) soils. Recent studies have shown an extraordinary high taxonomic diversity of yeasts in soils, including large numbers of potential new species and genera.

Yeasts have been traditionally viewed as free-living unicellular fast-growing saprobes. However, current knowledge points to the large diversity of lifestyles among soils yeasts. Yeasts engage in close relationships with plants, animals, and other microorganisms as mutualists, antagonists, parasites, and prey. In the soil, these microscopic fungi are involved in nutrient cycling, including the decomposition and dissemination of organic matter. Their role in the soil ecosystem is not limited to the consumption and transformation of simple sugars. Many soil-borne yeasts are polytrophic species that are able grow on diverse carbon and nitrogen sources.

Several soil yeasts have been tested for their utility in biotechnological applications as plant growth promoters, antagonists of soil-borne pathogens, enzyme producers, and oleaginous yeasts.

This Special Issue ‘Yeasts in Soils’ focuses on the diversity and ecology of yeasts that inhabit soils and related substrates such as forest litter and peat. The issue will provide an overview of the current research in the field and present results or review biodiversity assessments (species inventories and distribution), ecology (community ecology and autecology), as well as the physiology of soil yeasts, their interactions, and biotechnological applications. Descriptions of new species isolated from soils can also be included in the issue.

Dr. Andrey M. Yurkov
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of Multifarious Plant Growth Promoting Trials of Yeast Isolated from the Soil of Assam Tea (Camellia sinensis var. assamica) Plantations in Northern Thailand
Microorganisms 2020, 8(8), 1168; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8081168 - 01 Aug 2020
Abstract
Some soil microorganisms, especially bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi, play a role in the promotion of plant growth. However, plant growth promotion involving yeasts in soil has not yet been extensively investigated. This study aimed to isolate and identify yeast strains obtained from soils [...] Read more.
Some soil microorganisms, especially bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi, play a role in the promotion of plant growth. However, plant growth promotion involving yeasts in soil has not yet been extensively investigated. This study aimed to isolate and identify yeast strains obtained from soils of the Assam tea plant (Camellia sinensis var. assamica) in northern Thailand and to investigate their plant growth promoting capabilities. A total of 42 yeast strains were obtained and identified by analysis of the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit ribosomal RNA gene. We identified 35 strains of six species belonging to the phylum Ascomycota, namely Aureobasidium melanogenum, Kazachstania aquatica, Saturnispora diversa, Saturnispora sekii, Schwanniomyces pseudopolymorphus and Wickerhamomyces anomalus, and six species were determined to belong to the phylum Basidiomycota, namely Apiotrichum scarabaeorum, Curvibasidium pallidicorallinum, Papiliotrema laurentii, Rhodosporidiobolus ruineniae, Trichosporon asahii and Trichosporon coremiiforme. Seven strains were representative of potential new species and belonged to the genera Galactomyces and Wickerhamomyces. A total of 28 strains were found to produce indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in a range of 2.12 to 37.32 mg/L, with the highest amount of IAA produced by R. ruineniae SDBR-CMU-S1-03. All yeast strains were positive in terms of ammonia production, and only eight strains were positive for siderophore production. Two yeast species, P. laurentii and W. anomalus, were able to solubilize the insoluble form of calcium and zinc. The ability to produce amylase, endogulcanase, lipase, pectinase, protease and xylanase was dependent upon the yeast species and strain involved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Yeasts in Soils)
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Open AccessArticle
Soil Yeast Communities in Revegetated Post-Mining and Adjacent Native Areas in Central Brazil
Microorganisms 2020, 8(8), 1116; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8081116 - 24 Jul 2020
Abstract
Yeasts represent an important component of the soil microbiome. In central Brazil, mining activities are among the main anthropogenic factors that influence the dynamics of the soil microbiota. Few studies have been dedicated to analysis of tropical soil yeast communities, and even fewer [...] Read more.
Yeasts represent an important component of the soil microbiome. In central Brazil, mining activities are among the main anthropogenic factors that influence the dynamics of the soil microbiota. Few studies have been dedicated to analysis of tropical soil yeast communities, and even fewer have focused on Brazilian hotspots influenced by mining activity. The aim of the current study was to describe soil yeast communities in a post-mining site with revegetated and native areas, along Neotropical Savanna and Atlantic Forest biomes. Yeast communities were described using a culture-based method and estimator-based species accumulation curves, and their associations with environmental characteristics were assessed using multivariate analysis. The results indicate a greater species richness for yeast communities in the revegetated area. We identified 37 species describing 86% of the estimated richness according to Chao2. Ascomycetous yeasts dominated over basidiomycetous species. Candida maltosa was the most frequent species in two phytocenoses. Red-pigmented yeasts were frequent only in the summer. The main soil attributes affecting yeast communities were texture and micronutrients. In conclusion, each phytocenosis showed a particular assemblage of species as a result of local environmental phenomena. The species richness in a Revegetated area points to a possible ecological role of yeast species in environmental recovery. This study provided the first comprehensive inventory of soil yeasts in major phytocenoses in Minas Gerais, Brazil. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Yeasts in Soils)
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